PUBLICATIONS:

Nature Morte

  • ISBN 9780500239063
  • 27.50 x 23.00 cm
  • PLC (no jacket) with tipped on plate to front board
  • 288pp
  • 391 Illustrations, 366 in colour
  • First published 2013
  • Thames & Hudson publisher
  • £35

This important, timely book reveals in over 400 illustrations how leading artists of the 21st century have reinvigorated a genre previously synonymous with 16th- and 17th-century Old Masters. These audacious new still lifes will redefine what it means to be a work of nature morte, or ‘dead nature’.

Whether in painting, photography, sculpture or video, contemporary artists have drawn on a tradition ripe with metaphorical and moral significance to create works of conceptual vivacity and striking beauty.

Michael Petry has structured the book according to the classic categories of the still-life tradition – Flora, Food, House and Home, Fauna and Death. Each chapter explores how the timeless symbol of the memento mori – a reminder of death, change and the passing of time – has been rediscovered for a new millennium.

Rebecca Scott 1987 – 2009

by Rebecca Scott

A portfolio of Rebecca Scott’s paintings and artwork from 1987-2009.

To preview the book and to place an order click here.

 

The Art of Not Making

  • ISBN 9780500290262
  • 27.50 x 23.00 cm
  • Paperback with flaps
  • 208pp
  • 324 Illustrations, 318 in colour
  • First published 2012
  • Thames & Hudson Publisher
  • £19.95

Can an artist claim that an object is a work of art if it has been made for him or her by someone else? If so, who is the ‘author’ of such a work? And just what is the difference between a work of art and a work of craft?

The Art of Not Making tackles these questions head on, exploring the concepts of authorship, artistic originality, skill, craftsmanship and the creative act, and highlighting the vital role that skills from craft and industrial production play in the creation of some of today’s most innovative and sought-after works of art.

Michael Petry presents the art of over 115 contemporary artists – including Takashi Murakami, Matthew Barney, Tony Cragg, Cornelia Parker, Grayson Perry, Ai Weiwei, Daniel Buren and Carsten Höller – all of whom have one thing in common: they do not always make their own work. Instead, they often either employ others to produce it on their behalf, or appropriate objects made by someone else. Original interviews with the artists and artisans offer insights into this creative collaboration, which often produces works breathtaking in their scope and ambition.

Art & Outrage: Provocation, Controversy and the Visual Arts

JOHN A. WALKER

Distributed for Pluto Press
288 pages | 5.31496 x 8.46457
Paper $42.00
ISBN: 9780745313542
Published January 1999

When art hits the headlines, it is usually because it has caused offence or is perceived by the media to have shock-value. Over the last fifty years many artists have been censored, vilified, accused of blasphemy and obscenity, threatened with violence, prosecuted and even imprisoned. Their work has been trashed by the media and physically attacked by the public.

In Art & Outrage, John A. Walker covers the period from the late 1940s to the 1990s to provide the first detailed survey of the most prominent cases of art that has scandalised. The work of some of Britain’s leading, and less well known, painters and sculptors of the postwar period is considered, such as Richard Hamilton, Bryan Organ, Rachel Whiteread, Reg Butler, Damien Hirst, Jamie Wagg, Barry Flanagan and Antony Gormley. Included are works made famous by the media, such as Carl Andre’s Tate Gallery installation of 120 bricks, Rick Gibson’s foetus earrings, Anthony-Noel Kelly’s cast body-parts sculptures and Marcus Harvey’s portrait of Myra Hindley. Walker describes how each incident emerged, considers the arguments for and against, and examines how each was concluded. While broadly sympathetic to radical contemporary art, Walker has some residual sympathy for the layperson’s bafflement and antagonism. This is a scholarly yet accessible study of the interface between art, society and mass media which offers an alternative history of postwar British art and attitudes.

New feminist art criticism : critical strategies

Why have there been no Great Women Pornographers?

New Strategies, Naomi Salaman, 1996

Edited by Katy Deepwell
English
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA and Canada by St. Martin’s Press, c1995.
xv, 201 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

This text reviews feminist art strategies as they emerged in the late 1980s and early 1990s in America and the UK. It draws together the views of prominent practitioners, critics, academics and curators on a broad range of controversial issues. The central focus of the book is feminism’s engagement with psychoanalysis and post-modernism and its aim of deconstructing the borders between art and craft, and theory and practice. Feminist politics in the art world are also investigated through discussion of the negotiations of feminist curators, responses to feminist exhibitions, issues surrounding pornography and the censorship of women’s work, and the role of feminist teaching on fine art and design degree courses. The book covers a variety of art work, including installation work, painting, textiles and photography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)

More Publications

Golden Rain, On the Edge, exhibition catalogue, Stavanger, 2008

Abstract Eroticism, Art and Design, Academy Editions, London Paperback, 1996 Parallel Conjunction, Art and Design, 1995

British Art Defining the 90s, Mario Flecha, No 41, 1995

Works Perfectly, exhibition catalogue, text by Lynn Macritchie, 1994

Rebecca Scott at Mario Flecha, Mark Currah, Untitled, No6, 1994

Decoy, Andrea Schlieker, exhibition catalogue, Serpentine Gallery, May 1990

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